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TEA FAQs
We believe that the best way to further enjoy drinking tea is to arm yourself with the knowledge about what you are drinking. We will try to answer frequent questions about tea here. If you have a question that isn't answered, please contact us and we will try to give you the answer as soon as we can. Perhaps we will even add your question to our page.
 
 

How do you prepare a great cup of tea?

Start out with freshly filtered tap water. Warm your cup and/or teapot with some hot water first.

Here are some general guidelines to assist you in simple tea preparation. As with most rules, there will be exceptions to virtually every one of these, as well. Adjust the amount of tea per 8oz cup to your taste, but do not alter the recommended temperatures or infusion times.

WHITE TEA: Water temperature: 160-165 ° F. White tea is usually a large, long leaf, so one tablespoon of tea per 8oz cup. Steep for 2 1/2 - 3 minutes. Multiple infusions: add 30 additional seconds for each subsequent infusion. Enjoy on it own or slightly sweetened if you must.

GREEN TEA: Water temperature: 175-185 ° F. One slightly rounded teaspoon per 8oz cup. Steep for 2 1/2 minutes. Multiple infusions: add 30 additional seconds for each subsequent infusion. Enjoy on it own or slightly sweetened if you must.

OOLONG TEA: Water temperature: 185-195 ° F. One slightly rounded teaspoon per 8oz cup. Steep for 3 - 3 1/2 minutes. Multiple infusions: add 30 additional seconds for each subsequent infusion. Enjoy on its own or slightly sweetened if you must.

BLACK TEA: Water temperature: 208-212 ° F. One slightly rounded teaspoon per 8oz cup. Steep for 4 - 4 1/2 minutes. One infusion only. Enjoy on its own or slightly sweetened. Add a touch of milk (not cream) if desired.

TISANES: Water temperature: 208-212 ° F. One slightly rounded teaspoon per 8oz cup. Steep for 5 minutes. One infusion only. Enjoy on its own or slightly sweetened.

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How do you store loose tea?

Tea has three natural enemies which reduce freshness: Air, Light, and Moisture. To prevent these elements from reducing the teas freshness, we pack in our signature resealable gold pouches. Unlike tins, our packages allow you to lightly press out the excess air from the tea as well as keeping out moisture and light. Our packaging and buying process allows the tea to remain garden fresh for up to 18 months.

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What is the difference between the various types of tea?

First, we want to point out that all tea (with the exception of tisanes) comes from the camellia sinensis plant. The treatment of the leaves after harvesting (otherwise referred to as "flushing") is what makes them into their different types.

White Tea: A shade grown plant that generally have large leaves and a very pale green to white color. The leaves are unoxidized, meaning they have only been withered and dried. The beverage is light to the palate and typically found very light in color. Adding flavoring to this tea is not preferred, but being found to be more popular in the American market. Caffeine levels are low and the leaves are good for multiple infusions.

Green Tea: Found in multiple varieties and styles depending on country and region that it is grown. The leaves are unoxidized, meaning they have only been withered and dried. Depending on the size of the leaf and various factors in care of the leaf, green teas can range in taste from rich and grassy to light and springy. Beverage color can range from very pale green to brown-green. Adding flavoring to this tea is not preferred, but being found to be more popular in the American market. Caffeine levels are low and the leaves are good for multiple infusions.

Oolong Tea: Found in multiple varieties and styles depending on country and region that it is grown. The leaves can be either left in their natural large form or rolled tightly, though the leaves are always large after being infused. The leaves are partially oxidized, meaning they have been withered, dried and undergone a portion of the oxidation process. Adding flavoring to this tea is not preferred, but being found to be more popular in the American market. Caffeine levels are slightly higher than white or green tea and the leaves are good for multiple infusions.

Black Tea: The most common type of tea available. The varieties are many and determined by country and style of leaf drying techniques. The leaves can be left in their whole state, broken to make the infusion stronger and even slightly rolled to make a needle like appearance. The leaves are fully oxidized, which means they have been withered, dried and undergone the full oxidation process. Flavored varieties are many as well as blends of several types of black tea and single estate varieties. Caffeine levels are higher than that of the other types, but still much lower than that of coffee. The leaves are good for only one infusion.

Tisanes: Tisane is a French word that means any type of infusion of herbs, fruits or flowers. Tisanes are commonly referred to as "Herbal Teas"; however, since they do not have the tea leaf in them, they should be referred to as Herbal Infusions or Tisanes. Tisanes can be blends of dried fruits, flowers, herbs, and other plants. Common tisane ingredients include chamomile flowers, peppermint leaves, hibiscus petals, rooibus (red bush), dried fruits of many varieties, and much more. Tisanes are caffeine-free and generally make delicious hot or iced beverages. Good for only one infusion.

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What is Chai?

Chai, the Indian word for tea, is understood in America as an Indian way of preparing tea. Black tea blended with spices and prepared with sugar and milk. We offer an authentic masala chai at TEA ReX®. In India, the word "masala" refers to a traditional blend of fragrant spices, an essential ingredient in cooking and in tea. Many recipes are treasured family blends, and vary from family to family and region to region. Chai is as popular in India as coffee is here in America. Now you can enjoy authentic Indian Masala Chai right in your own home!

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What are antioxidants and what tea has the most of them?

Let us get a little technical here...

All cells in our body perform a function, when they do they also produce waste. That waste is called free radicals. A build up of free radicals in the body have been linked to many forms of medical problems such as cancer, decreased bone density, and more. Antioxidants are the combatants of free radicals by helping lower or even eliminate the amount of free radicals in the body. This helps to also reduce the signs of aging by allowing our skin to retain greater elasticity and show fewer wrinkles. The infusion of tea in body lotions and washes are also signs of the new research in benefits of tea and its effects through topical application. Tea has been found to help many common medical conditions, from bad breath to osteoporosis.

Now, as far as which tea is best...

Although white and green tea are most often mentioned when discussing the health benefits, we would like to point out that since all tea comes from the camellia sinensis plant, all tea therefore contain some level of antioxidants. Research is only in the beginning phases of determining how much benefit can come from consumption of black tea, but look for more and more information to become available. The antioxidants found in tea are called polyphenols, which are said to be some of the most healthful forms of antioxidants. White and green teas contain higher levels of polyphenols because they are unoxidized leaves, leaving a greater amount of the naturally occurring polyphenols. However, there doesn't seem to be a gigantic difference in the levels of polyphenols from one type of green tea to another type of green tea. The only significant difference is found between tea bags and loose-leaf tea. Because loose-leaf tea is in a more natural, whole form, it contains significantly higher levels of antioxidants than its counterparts in tea bags.

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